Article Op-Ed

Imam Abdullah Jaber & Masjid Omar ( When Political Agenda Edges Youth Uplift)

Imam Abdullah Jaber & Masjid Omar ( When Political Agenda Edges Youth Uplift)


Author Youssef Arman by

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I remember the first time I heard a khutba from Imam Abdullah Jaber, emotional uplift to my inner self and well being. It was music to my ears and healing for my soul. It was a combination of application and emotion.

When you hear ex-Imam Abdullah Jaber (thats right people, ex-Imam Abdullah Jaber), tackle major issues in our community, including marriage, divorce, family, education, well being, work, happiness, success, dunya and akhera, you can only feel this urge and positiviity for well being. His khutbas mainly invoke an action to do and become better, and is not just words. He tells you it's ok to be sad, and look for help by seeking guidance from duaa to Allah, medical help, and by relating to stories our prophets had dealt with. He has mentioned the Ezza of al-Umma and how youth led armies in the age of Prophet Mohammed (may peace and prayers be upon him), the need to be productive at all stages of our lives, and how no small action is too small for the Nahda and Ezza of our Umma (and no I am not promoting violence here, to all the smarty pants out there). He taught us how it's ok to smile at one another? and how a simple smile can change the course of ones day as instructed by our Prophet Mohammed.

He teaches us about the compassionate and true romantic human being of all time. No, I am not referring to the Titanic or Romeo & Juliet. I am referring to our beloved Prophet, peace be upon him: how he was fair and kind, how he allowed a stranger to urinate in a mosque, and did not humiliate him. How our prophet would only say kind words to his wife, and show passion and mercy at all time. How our prophet would consult with his family in difficult times.

Sheikh Jaber would always use his khutbas to show us how that we should never give up in life, always have temporary goals to accomplish, and excel in any task we perform. Just as our beloved Prophet Mohammed (pbuh) taught us, we are the best umma of the people, commanding good, and denying evil. Sheikh Jaber's motto is to do and act---not just talk the talk, but walk the walk and take action for success, and never give up.

Sheikh Jaber would always bring the stories of the Quran and Sahaba to life by showing how difficult times can be resolved by the will of Allah. Any person can relate to his khutbas, let it be a youngster trying to succeed in school, a person who is looking for work, a person who has issues with his marriage or who is looking to have a kid one day.

When Sheikh Jaber would tell his stories, I would stop myself from crying at his khutba, as it was so emotional because you feel the Quran is speaking to you,especially the way Sheikh Abdulllah Jaber would have his khutab structured in such a confined clear manner. He would always lead by example.

Hold on, what's my proof? When I asked him why he left Califonia and decided to come to Atlanta, mentioned his parent was sick and thus decided to let everything go for that. Yes, ladies and gentelman. You don't leave lovely California for Georgia without a good excuse, and for him it was enough to put everything aside for that cause.

He was always looking for the good of community, and tackling the issues that hurt the most. Why, I would love to ask, would you remove a person from office who had such a positive impact on the youth and elders? Sheikh Abdullah Jaber was always against racism, and promotes equality, justice and well being of societies. He would encourage families to stick together, but would be against injustice when it occurs. He always would have duaa for the Muslim Umma, asking them to be united and unified. His tactic is as following: identify a problem no ones dares to talk about; give solutions on a practical point of view and emotional view.

My personal belief about why he was removed from office is that our leaders in the community were resisting change and were fearful that such change may impact their position in office.

Unfortuntely, fear can spark unjust reactions, which is what happened at Masjid Omar.

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